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Sweet or Nah? The Effects of Sugar in Louisiana, 1795 to 2020

Suggested Reads

Shlomowitz, Ralph. “‘Bound’ or ‘Free’? Black Labor in Cotton and Sugarcane Farming, 1865-1880.” The Journal of Southern History, vol. 50, no. 4, 1984, pp. 569–596 JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2208473. Accessed 1 Apr. 2020.


​Pellegrin, Roland J., and Vernon J. Parenton. “The Impact of Socio-Economic Change on Racial Groups in a Rural Setting.” Phylon (1960-), vol. 23, no. 1, 1962, pp. 55–60. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/274143. Accessed 1 Apr. 2020.


“Slave Tourism and Rememory.” Embodying American Slavery in Contemporary Culture, by LISA WOOLFORK, University of Illinois Press, 2009, pp. 98–131. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt1xcq3x.8. Accessed 1 Apr. 2020.

Items of Interest

Fugitive Slave Ad

Though it was difficult for slaves from Louisiana to escape the state, they still made attempts and sometimes made it to different areas across the state. Fugitive slave ads give great insight. This slave left St. Mary Parish and was captured in St. Landry Parish; this is a distance of over 80 miles. He had a stout build and was in his early 20s. This was the typical build of a young, male slave working on the sugar plantations. He spoke both English and French which suggests that his master may have been a native of Louisiana, from an Anglo-Saxon family that moved to Louisiana after the Louisiana Purchase or a descendant of both.

Louisiana Digital Library

Fugitive Slave Ad

Here is another ad for a runaway slave in the Sugar Parishes. A racially-mixed slave (the term mulatto is a then-contemporary term for a person of African American and Caucasian descent) purchased from New Orleans, La.

Louisiana Digital Library