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HIST 471: A Guide to Holocaust Memory

This lib guide aids in providing resources that will help students and researchers investigate public engagement with the Holocaust.

Holocaust in Popular Culture

The Holocaust is one of the most discussed events of the twentieth century. Researchers, scholars, historians, and people of all walks of life remain intrigued, amazed, and horrified at the near genocide that Adolf Hitler and the German state sought to inflict on the Jewish people. Because it is so heavily discussed, discussions around the holocaust did not remain in the academic sphere. The Holocaust has crossed over into pop culture and is the backdrop for historical fiction, motion pictures, and documentaries.

The Holocaust in the Media

  • Image and Remembrance: Representation and the Holocaust. Edited by Shelley Hornstein and Florance Jacobwitz. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2002.
  • Impossible Images: Contemporary Art After the Holocaust. Edited by Shelley Hornstein, Laura Levitt, and Laurence L. Silberstein. New York, NY: NYU Press, 2003.
  • Shenker, Noah. Reframing Holocaust Testimony: The Modern Jewish Experience. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2015.
  • Young, James E. At Memory’s Edge: After-Images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2000.

The Holocaust in Literature

  • Adorno, Theodor W., Can One Live After Auschwitz?: A Philosophical Reader, ed. By Rolf Tiedemann, trans. by Rodney Livingstone et al, Cultural Memory in the Present. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003.
  • Berger, Alan L. Children of Job : American Second-generation Witnesses to the Holocaust. SUNY Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1997.
  • Berger, Alan ,“Ashes and Hope: The Holocaust in Second Generation American Literature” ed. Braham, Randolph L. Reflections of the Holocaust in Art and Literature. New York : Distributed by Columbia University Press, 1990.
  • Budick, E. Miller. The Subject of Holocaust Fiction. Jewish Literature and Culture. Bloomington ; Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2015.
  • Ezrahi, Sidra DeKoven. By Words Alone : The Holocaust in Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980.
  • Hartman, Geoffery. “History Writing and the Role of Fiction” ,ed. Spargo, R. Clifton., Ehrenreich, Robert M, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, After Representation? : The Holocaust, Literature, and Culture. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2010.
  • Horowitz, Sara R. Voicing the Void : Muteness and Memory in Holocaust Fiction. SUNY Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 1997.
  • Lang, Berel. Holocaust Representation : Art within the Limits of History and Ethics. Baltimore, Md. ; London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
  • Langer, Lawrence L. The Holocaust and the Literary Imagination. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1975.
  • Langer, Lawrence. “Fictional Facts and Factual Fictions”, ed. Braham, Randolph L. Reflections of the Holocaust in Art and Literature. New York : Distributed by Columbia University Press, 1990.
  • Rosen, Norma. Accidents of Influence : Writing as a Woman and a Jew in America. SUNY Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992.
  • Rosenfeld, Alvin H. A Double Dying : Reflections on Holocaust Literature. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980.
  • Spargo, R. Clifton., Ehrenreich, Robert M, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, After Representation? : The Holocaust, Literature, and Culture. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2010.
  • Young, James Edward. Writing and Rewriting the Holocaust : Narrative and the Consequences of Interpretation. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988.